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Gielgud Theatre

The Gielgud Theatre is a West End theatre, located on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, London, at the corner of Rupert Street. The house currently has 986 seats on three levels.
The theatre was designed by W.G.R. Sprague and opened on 27 December 1906 as the Hicks Theatre, named after Seymour Hicks, for whom it was built. The first play at the theatre was a hit musical called The Beauty of Bath co-written by Hicks. Another big success was A Waltz Dream in 1908. In 1909, the American impresario Charles Frohman became manager of the theatre and renamed the house the Globe Theatre – a name that it retained for 85 years. Call It a Day opened in 1935 and ran for 509 performances, a long run for the slow inter-war years. There's a Girl in My Soup, opening in 1966, ran for almost three years, a record for the theatre that was not surpassed until Daisy Pulls It Off opened in April 1983 to run for 1,180 performances, the theatre's longest run. In 1987 Peter Shaffer's play Lettice and Lovage opened, starring Maggie Smith, and became a hit.
The Globe's theatre cat, named Beerbohm, became famous enough to receive a front page obituary in the theatrical publication, The Stage in 1995. Refurbished in 1987, the theatre has since presented several Alan Ayckbourn premieres, including 1990's Man of the Moment, as well as a notable revival of An Ideal Husband in 1992. During reconstruction of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre on the South Bank, in 1994 the theatre was renamed the Gielgud Theatre in honour of John Gielgud. Another refurbishment was completed in 2008.

Contact Gielgud Theatre

Get involved with shows at the Gielgud Theatre:

Shows

  • Sun 24 Feb
  • Mon 25 Feb
  • Tue 26 Feb
  • Wed 27 Feb
  • Thu 28 Feb
  • Fri 1 Mar
  • Sat 2 Mar
  • Sun 31 Mar
  • Mon 1 Apr
  • Tue 2 Apr
  • Wed 3 Apr
  • Thu 4 Apr
  • Fri 5 Apr
  • Sat 6 Apr
  • Sun 7 Apr
  • Mon 8 Apr
  • Tue 9 Apr
  • Wed 10 Apr
  • Thu 11 Apr
  • Fri 12 Apr
  • Sat 13 Apr
  • Sun 14 Apr
  • Mon 15 Apr
  • Tue 16 Apr
  • Wed 17 Apr
  • Thu 18 Apr
  • Fri 19 Apr
  • Sat 20 Apr
  • Sun 5 May
  • Mon 6 May
  • Tue 7 May
  • Wed 8 May
  • Thu 9 May
  • Fri 10 May
  • Sat 11 May
  • Sun 16 Jun
  • Mon 17 Jun
  • Tue 18 Jun
  • Wed 19 Jun
  • Thu 20 Jun
  • Fri 21 Jun
  • Sat 22 Jun
  • Sun 23 Jun
  • Mon 24 Jun
  • Tue 25 Jun
  • Wed 26 Jun
  • Thu 27 Jun
  • Fri 28 Jun
  • Sat 29 Jun
  • Sun 4 Aug
  • Mon 5 Aug
  • Tue 6 Aug
  • Wed 7 Aug
  • Thu 8 Aug
  • Fri 9 Aug
  • Sat 10 Aug
  • Sun 11 Aug
  • Mon 12 Aug
  • Tue 13 Aug
  • Wed 14 Aug
  • Thu 15 Aug
  • Fri 16 Aug
  • Sat 17 Aug
  • Sun 18 Aug
  • Mon 19 Aug
  • Tue 20 Aug
  • Wed 21 Aug
  • Thu 22 Aug
  • Fri 23 Aug
  • Sat 24 Aug

Past shows

See all the shows that have been performed here at the venue history page.